• What Is Financial Health? Financial health is a term used to describe the state of one's personal monetary affairs. There are many dimensions to financial health, including the amount of savings you have, how much you’re putting away for retirement, and how much of your income you are spending on fixed or non-discretionary expenses. KEY TAKEAWAYS The state[...]

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    Few are prepared as financial decision-making grows more complex Many consumers have little understanding of finances, how credit works, and the potential hit to financial well-being that poor financial decisions can create for many, many years. In fact, a lack of financial understanding has been signaled as one of the main reasons many Americans struggle with saving and investing. [...]

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    What to do now, as the pandemic surges yet again in the U.S. COVID-19 is once again raging throughout the U.S., and in much of the world it has never stopped doing so. Safe and highly effective vaccines are available, but not everywhere, and even where they are, not everyone who is eligible has gotten them. That means there is still the possibility of accompanying financial volatility, despite[...]

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    KEY POINTS The Covid-19 pandemic has hurt some Americans’ confidence that they can meet their retirement goal date on time. Among those feeling the most negative effects are women and pre-retirees. Even so, many Americans say the pandemic was a financial wake-up call that prompted them to rethink how they plan for their futures. It’s no secret that Covid-19 has upended [...]

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    Studying behavioral economics has taught me that our brains don’t make it easier for us to save. Psychology is often just as important in personal finance as are the numbers — the way we save, spend and invest are all influenced by the way we think and feel, especially when it comes to preparing for future events like retirement. Saving money for retirement is important because [...]

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    If you earn money from the sale of a capital asset — your home, part of a business, stocks, or bonds, for example — that profit may be subject to capital gains tax. There are two categories of capital gains: short term (assets held for a year or less) and long term (assets held for longer than one year). The day you acquire the asset isn't included in your holding period, but the day you [...]

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    Most people over 65 will eventually need some form of paid care. Here are some ways to plan ahead. Many people are frightened of long-term care costs — for good reason. Most people over 65 eventually will need help with daily living tasks, such as bathing, eating or dressing. Men will need assistance for an average of 2.2 years, while women will need it for 3.7 years, according to the [...]

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    If you want to retire in the next 10 years, lower your spending and increase your income. Paying off debt can give you more money to save and invest, and free up your budget later. Increasing your income with a raise or side hustle could give you more money to save. If you want to retire in 10 years, it might be possible. But it'll require some work. Getting your finances in order[...]

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    More people are retiring with less savings than they need to be comfortable. Much less. According to Northwestern Mutual, 21% of Americans have no retirement savings at all. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) says around 29% of households age 55 and older have neither retirement savings nor a pension. These numbers may sound surprising and even daunting, but it’s important to [...]

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    Going from saver to spender is mostly a matter of psychology It's Time to Wind Down You've done all the right things—financially speaking, at least—in saving for retirement. You started saving early to take advantage of the power of compounding, maxed out your 401(k) and individual retirement account (IRA) contributions every year, made smart investments, squirreled away money into [...]

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